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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

FEATURE ARTICLES

1937 Buick Special Business Coupe: A Restoration Journal — Part 27 - Page 3

The rear edge of the headliner is tacked to the back board.  From here the headliner is tacked to the lower edge of the rear window relief and the trim is installed.  Then the cloth is cut from the opening.

The rear edge of the headliner is tacked to the back board. From here the headliner is tacked to the lower edge of the rear window relief and the trim is installed. Then the cloth is cut from the opening.


Finished product looking rearward..

Finished product looking rearward.


Finally, I secured the rear window molding in place and then cut the hole in the headliner. The first time I installed the headliner I cut the hole before installation. That is why I had poor results the first time. This time, however, the headliner around the rear window is tight and complete.

To hide your side tack strips and finish the presentation, you need to install wire-on and windlace. The windlace is trim but the wire-on is what makes a job look finished. This is accomplished by placing the windlace in position and then putting wire-on on top. A nail or staple is then installed and you do this until your entire strip is complete. As the name implies, wire-on has flexible wire inside of it. After its installation, you come back and fold the wire-on, using half of the wire-on to conceal your tacks or staples.

I am very proud of my headliner installation. There are many portions of my Buick where I can say "Well I could have improved this or that." But the headliner is one of the few that I can say "I did that perfectly." For me, it was absolutely worth the money for a second headliner to do the job right. The interior quarter panels, dome light, sun visors and rear-view window were then installed, followed by the seats. Door panels will be installed in the future so, for now, the interior of my car is complete.

Side view shows the dome light, rear quarter and edge of unrestored sun visor.

Side view shows the dome light, rear quarter and edge of unrestored sun visor.


I will point out that I did not restore my interior deck lid hardware, rearview mirror or sun visors and this was intentional. When I got my car, aside from the exterior paint, everything else was original and unmodified from the day it left the factory. I felt a little guilty about deleting all of the car's history so that is why I kept a few little pieces 100% original. All of these pieces are easily accessible, so, if I really want to change them in the future, it's only a matter of removing a few screws.

It appears that I really am on the homestretch with my car. I'm sure after it's on the road there will be dozens of small projects and adjustments, but all of the big stuff will be completed very soon. The only major portions that remain include the front and rear fenders and the hood and grille. My family seems to have found its new normal so my time to work on the Buick is now clear.

My next journal article will be my last and as I look back on 5-years of progress photos I can't believe how far the project has come. My overriding thought while looking at those pictures is how naïve I was. Maybe naiveté is the best tool to tackle a job like this.