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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

THE GOOD OL' DAYS

The 1934 Cars

Published in the January 1934 MoToR Magazine (Trade journal for car dealers). Reproduced by permission. Visit www.motor.com

Pierce-Arrow has graceful lines designed to reduce air resistance

Pierce-Arrow has graceful lines designed to reduce air resistance


NINETEEN THIRTY-FOUR will be known in automotive history as a year of important developments. Heading the list are independently sprung front wheels, which are used on the Plymouth and De Soto and on all General Motors cars. They are also optional equipment on Hudson and Terraplane.

Also at the top of the list of innovations must be placed the highly streamlined De Soto and Chrysler models.

For the first time, also, a super-charger has been made standard equipment on a production eight — the de luxe Graham.

Automatic choke is gaining ground. This is the Hudson installation with thermostat in round box just below air cleaner.

Automatic choke is gaining ground. This is the Hudson installation with thermostat in round box just below air cleaner.


There are numerous other improvements. Most cars now have an automatic choke. The majority of cars have a simplified method of starting although the details vary greatly. Some use Startix. On others the engine is cranked by depressing the accelerator pedal while Nash closes the starter circuit by pushing out the clutch pedal.

Easier starting is an important feature of several makes. On the Nash, the starter switch is closed by depressing the clutch pedal.

Easier starting is an important feature of several makes. On the Nash, the starter switch is closed by depressing the clutch pedal.


A vacuum-operated clutch is fitted to the Auburn, Chrysler, De Soto, Dodge, Hudson, Plymouth, Stutz and Terraplane and vacuum-operated brakes are used on Auburn Custom Eight, Buick, Cadillac, Chrysler Imperials, Duesenberg, De Soto, Lincoln, Packard, Stutz, Studebaker President and Commander.

Larger tires and less inflation are features of several cars and steel-spoked wheels are more popular. Nearly all the new models have built-in radios as optional equipment, usually with the controls neatly and conveniently incorporated in the instrument panel.

Low pressure tires and new design steel wheels are a notable 1934 trend.

Low pressure tires and new design steel wheels are a notable 1934 trend.


Radio is recognized by several makes, with built-in control on the dash in addition to the usual aerial equipment. Packard's neat installation is shown in the center of the instrument board.

Radio is recognized by several makes, with built-in control on the dash in addition to the usual aerial equipment. Packard's neat installation is shown in the center of the instrument board.


To return to the subject of independently sprung wheels, it is desirable, first of all, to define the expression. An independently sprung wheel is one which follows the surface of the road without (appreciably) affecting its companion wheel, whereas with conventional springs and axles, a jolt received by one wheel has more or less effect on the companion wheel. Particularly is this true at the front. Usually independent springing eliminates the axle but not always.

Either front or rear wheels or both may be independently sprung. Dozens of different schemes for independent springing have been developed — mostly in Europe where this new spring suspension system has been used on some cars for a long time.

Independent wheels...Hudson-Terraplane offers as optional equipment independent wheel suspension accomplished by using a jointed front axle. The wheel at the right is raised to show the action.

Independent wheels...Hudson-Terraplane offers as optional equipment independent wheel suspension accomplished by using a jointed front axle. The wheel at the right is raised to show the action.


It would be difficult to say who built the first vehicle with independent wheel suspension, but the idea must be almost as old as the automobile itself. Certainly it was an old story 25 years ago.

Even before that there were sulkys for trotting races, which had independently sprung wheels. And for that matter, the spring fork which cushions the front end of a motorcycle bears a strong resemblance in principle to the parallel lever arm arrangement seen on several of this year's cars — even to the coil spring.

While the majority of European cars have conventional springing, there are nevertheless numerous makes with independent springing, and some have had it for years. As to why the idea caught on in Europe so much sooner than it did here, the main answer is that during and since the war, roads have generally been allowed to deteriorate to an objectionable degree of roughness. Therefore some designers, to obtain a satisfactory ride, turned to the independently sprung wheel.

Buick front end has parallel yoke levers and upright coil springs to give wheels independent action and absorb road shocks.

Buick front end has parallel yoke levers and upright coil springs to give wheels independent action and absorb road shocks.


Shimmy, tramp and other front end difficulties naturally were aggravated by these rough roads and designers saw the opportunity of eliminating or reducing these problems by divorcing the front wheels.