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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

READERS' PROJECTS

1956 Chevrolet BelAir Restoration Project — Part 17

By Steve Nicholson

Most of us involved with classic cars know that it takes a lot of work to make a car body "straight" even after all of the metal work and rust repairs are finished. It typically involves a lot of hours block sanding body filler and primer. That's currently where we're at on the '56 project.

We prefer to use "tack free" body fillers. They sand much easier than the older "bondo" type fillers. They also dry without the annoying sticky skin associated with the older fillers too. There are several good brands available such as Evercoat Rage Gold, Rage Extreme, and 3M Premium Lightweight to name a few.

The trunk lid was repaired and sprayed with 2k primer. It was then re-fitted to the car to check the fit and the body work around the lid.

1956 Chevy Trunk


1956 chevrolet trunk


1956 chevrolet trunk


After the metal work was finished on the doors they were also skim coated with filler and block sanded straight. They were then primed with epoxy primer followed by a 2K primer.

1956 chevrolet door


1956 chevrolet door


1956 chevrolet door


The red tint on the primered door is what we call "guide coat". Basically it's a thin layer of primer or paint sprayed over the primer to show low and high areas as the part is block sanded. Two different colors of primer can also be used, such as priming with light gray first followed by a dark gray. The red on this door is a left over miss-matched red basecoat.

The roof skin was badly dented up and needed a lot of metal shrinking and hammer/dolly work to get it straightened back out.

working on roof of 1956 chevrolet project