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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

PRODUCT REVIEWS

A Review of a Combo Lathe and Milling Head: Why would I want one? - Page 3

Photo 11 — Close up view of the internal threads cut into the gas cap. The lathe head was turned manually (in reverse) several times to achieve these threads.

Photo 11 — Close up view of the internal threads cut into the gas cap. The lathe head was turned manually (in reverse) several times to achieve these threads.


Photo 12 — Another example of a part machined on the 1220 XL machine. This threaded radiator cap is a plain cap or a touring cap if an owner does not want to use the more valuable grey hound radiator ornament while on a car tour or left overnight at a hotel. The plain cap can be further machined to bore a hole to accept the grey hound.

Photo 12 — Another example of a part machined on the 1220 XL machine. This threaded radiator cap is a plain cap or a touring cap if an owner does not want to use the more valuable grey hound radiator ornament while on a car tour or left overnight at a hotel. The plain cap can be further machined to bore a hole to accept the grey hound.


Photo 13 — The plain radiator cap threaded onto the mandrel used to machine this cap. The mandrel is solid stock of 12L14, an alloy which gives a smooth, machined surface and because of its low friction component allows for increased tool life. 12L14 is commonly referred to by the trade name Ledloyâ„¢ The mandrel would be needed if the center were to be bored out or the edge knurled.

Photo 13 — The plain radiator cap threaded onto the mandrel used to machine this cap. The mandrel is solid stock of 12L14, an alloy which gives a smooth, machined surface and because of its low friction component allows for increased tool life. 12L14 is commonly referred to by the trade name Ledloyâ„¢ The mandrel would be needed if the center were to be bored out or the edge knurled.


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Photo 14 — Automobiles of the 1920's and 1930's used a cigar lighter with a pull cord tip. The tip could removed and fitted with a work light, useful when changing a tire in the dark. These tips are often broken or missing and replacements were machined on the 1220 XL machine.

Photo 14 — Automobiles of the 1920's and 1930's used a cigar lighter with a pull cord tip. The tip could removed and fitted with a work light, useful when changing a tire in the dark. These tips are often broken or missing and replacements were machined on the 1220 XL machine.


Photo 15 — Cigar lighter parts: Jamb-locking nuts, threaded bezels, lighter main body, and threaded tip (which holds the heating element). Parts like these are small and require a mandrel to chuck the work piece as part of the machining process.

Photo 15 — Cigar lighter parts: Jamb-locking nuts, threaded bezels, lighter main body, and threaded tip (which holds the heating element). Parts like these are small and require a mandrel to chuck the work piece as part of the machining process.


Photo 16 — Closer view of the cigar lighter parts, all requiring turning on the lathe or precision drilling and all required some sort of mandrel, both with male and female threads.

Photo 16 — Closer view of the cigar lighter parts, all requiring turning on the lathe or precision drilling and all required some sort of mandrel, both with male and female threads.


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