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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Auto Upholstery Series Part 1: Auto Upholstery for Beginners - Page 5

Thread Routing to the Needle After leaving the tension adjuster, thread is routed upward through a special clip, the hole in the arm above the clip, down to another clip as shown in Photo 22. These special clips have a unique hook shape where a tightly stretched thread can run through the hook without having to "thread" it through the hole. The thread is further routed through the special hook, a pressure holder, and hook as shown in Photo 23. These hooks are like the previous hooks where under tension the thread can be pulled in to the hook. The little Tab is a spring loaded and a simple push of your thumb on the left side pivots the Tab up to pull the thread down the right side. The final thread routing is through the loop on the needle foot (above the needle, Photo 24) and through the left side of the needle itself. A Needle Threader is an invaluable tool for getting the thread through the needle (Photos 25-27).

Photo 22: Thread leaves the hair spring up through special hooks, the tension arm and back through another hook. These hooks have a unique profile where pulling the thread taunt between both hands, thread usually snaps into place. A little practice will make this easy.

Photo 22 Thread leaves the hair spring up through special hooks, the tension arm and back through another hook. These hooks have a unique profile where pulling the thread taunt between both hands, thread usually snaps into place. A little practice will make this easy.


Photo 23: Another set of hooks and thread holder. The holder can be pushed in on the left side to pivot it to slide the thread under the right tab. The thread continues under the next hook (loop).

Photo 23 Another set of hooks and thread holder. The holder can be pushed in on the left side to pivot it to slide the thread under the right tab. The thread continues under the next hook (loop).


Photo 24: Routing the thread continues through a small loop on the needle foot. There is no special hook here; you will have to push the end of the thread through the loop.

Photo 24 Routing the thread continues through a small loop on the needle foot. There is no special hook here; you will have to push the end of the thread through the loop.


Photo 25: A valuable tool is this needle threader. It has a hair like spring on the end that is pushed into the needle's hole.

Photo 25 A valuable tool is this needle threader. It has a hair like spring on the end that is pushed into the needle's hole.


Photo 26: Close up view of the needle threader pushed through the needle's hole. Once through needle, the thread is slipped into the hair spring.

Photo 26 Close up view of the needle threader pushed through the needle's hole. Once through needle, the thread is slipped into the hair spring.


Photo 27: The threader is pulled through the needle's hole pulling the thread with it. This usually is easier than trying to push the thread through the needle.

Photo 27 The threader is pulled through the needle's hole pulling the thread with it. This usually is easier than trying to push the thread through the needle.


One more step is necessary to ready the machine for stitching: Pulling up the bobbin thread. Move the hand wheel forward (and only forward, never back) to move the needle down and up for one stroke. Lifting the presser foot (either hand lever or knee lift) reveals the top stitch and bobbin threads. Using a small screw driver, dental pick, or small scissor, pull both threads back behind the foot/needle foot (Photo 28).

Photo 28: Close up view of the presser foot and needle foot with the needle on the down stroke. The thread is routed through the hole at the bottom of the needle on the left side. Note the groove on the side of the needle. This is where the thread will ride in during each stitch. Shown here the presser foot is raised after one needle stroke to catch the bobbin thread and was pulled up and then pulled back behind the presser foot. Both top stitch and bobbin threads should be in the pulled back position before starting any stitching.

Photo 28 Close up view of the presser foot and needle foot with the needle on the down stroke. The thread is routed through the hole at the bottom of the needle on the left side. Note the groove on the side of the needle. This is where the thread will ride in during each stitch. Shown here the presser foot is raised after one needle stroke to catch the bobbin thread and was pulled up and then pulled back behind the presser foot. Both top stitch and bobbin threads should be in the pulled back position before starting any stitching.