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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 3 - Page 5

Photo 64 — Cut the inside covering with miter cuts. Glue the covering into the corners and be careful not to tear the covering.

Photo 64 — Cut the inside covering with miter cuts. Glue the covering into the corners being careful not to tear the covering.


Photo 65 — Decorative nails can vary from vendor to vendor. The one on the left is slightly smaller and may be the right one for your project like nailing leather trim. This project trunk used the one on the right for the corner hardware.

Photo 65 — Decorative nails can vary from vendor to vendor. The one on the left is slightly smaller and may be the right one for your project for uses such as nailing leather trim. This project trunk used the one on the right for applying the corner hardware.


Different covering materials will produce different results. You should practice covering some scrap pieces with folds both over outside and inside corners to see how your covering material effects the final appearance. If the material you're using has a pattern, orient the material so mating surfaces appear consistent. Use a good contact adhesive that is rated for a wide range of temperatures. If your design permits metal or leather corner protectors, these are a good location to hide seams. If possible, a single piece of material should be used for the whole project. In this project, the covering techniques were:

  1. Base — Two pieces; one large piece of material with seams to the back and a second small piece applied between the seams. To be symmetrical, two vertical seams were strategically placed in the rear. Two polished metal strips will hide each seam. This is a perfect application of the dome nails offered by Frank Chervan to adhere the strips. After the front of the base is covered, apply the piano hinge using the threaded rivets and then after the one row is populated and tightened, continue to cover the holes accessed to the threaded rivets. Typically, you will use interior and exterior covering material to cover over those holes.
  2. Front panel — One piece with seams on the inside edges of the hardwood. It was planned to use a separate thin wood (luan) precovered panel to insert between the hardwood edges to make a clean look (Photos 15, 61 & 62 show this technique).
  3. Lid — One piece material with seams at the corners. Corner edges can be covered with a leather material or metal angle strips. In this project, aluminum angle was fitted and powder coated flat black to blend into the black covering material. The metal corners selected earlier will cover any other seam areas (Photo 67).
Photo 66 — The outside metal corners are fitted and applied over the outside corners (and seams). A plastic mallet is used to drive the three nails on the ends.

Photo 66 — The outside metal corners are fitted and applied over the outside corners (and seams). A plastic mallet is used to drive the three nails on the ends.


Photo 67 — The last step in this trunk project is applying thin wall angle aluminum that has been cut, fitted, drilled for small nails, and powder coated flat black for both the front and rear corners. These were the corners on the lid that had a seam exposed. The flat black color makes them blend into the material and are barely visible. The small nail heads in the short rear angle piece were intentionally not painted for the photo to illustrate their location and comparison and later hand painted. Note that they are fitted right up to the metal corner and small amounts of marine sealer like 3M 4200 were placed under the angle to seal out water.

Photo 67 — The last step in this trunk project is applying thin wall angle aluminum that has been cut, fitted, drilled for small nails, and powder coated flat black for both the front and rear corners. These were the corners on the lid that had a seam exposed. The flat black color makes them blend into the material and they are barely visible. We left the small nail heads in the short rear angle piece unpainted for the photo to make their location easier for you to see. We hand painted later. Note that these corner protectors are fitted right up to the metal corner and small amounts of marine sealer like 3M 4200 were placed under the angle to seal out water.


Photo 68 — Referring to the blind fasteners in Photos 29 & 30. Here bottom view of 3/16 X 1 inch flat bar that is drilled and bolted into the blind fasteners. The flat bars are perpendicular and sandwich the trunk against rack. Note that a separate piece of unpainted aluminum sheet was nailed onto the bottom.

Photo 68 — Referring to the blind fasteners in Photos 29 & 30. Here bottom view of 3/16 X 1 inch flat bar that is drilled and bolted into the blind fasteners. The flat bars are perpendicular and sandwich the trunk against rack. Note that a separate piece of unpainted aluminum sheet was nailed onto the bottom.


Photo 69 — Test fit of the project trunk on the rack. The trunk's width is perfect as it sits between the racks angled edges. Note the aluminum sheet with its folded edge between the trunk and the rack.

Photo 69 — Test fit of the trunk on the rack. The trunk's width is perfect as it sits between the racks angled edges. Note the aluminum sheet with its folded edge between the trunk and the rack.