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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage


Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 3 - Page 4

Photo 58 — The main body flipped over revealing the back side. Here a straight edge is used to mark the seam that will be cut. A second short piece will be fitted between the two vertical seams. These two seams will later be covered with polished aluminum.

Photo 58 — The main body flipped over revealing the back side. Here a straight edge is used to mark the seam that will be cut. A second short piece will be fitted between the two vertical seams. These two seams will later be covered with polished aluminum.


Photo 59 — After the main body of the trunk is covered, now comes one of the most critical steps, cutting and gluing the inside edges. This is where practice on scrap wood and patience will be needed to finish your project trunk. Take your time warming the material using the heat gun and pulling the material over the edges. Suggest gluing one edge at a time as shown.

Photo 59 — After the main body of the trunk is covered, now comes one of the most critical steps, cutting and gluing the inside edges. This is where practice on scrap wood and patience will pay off. You've come a long way and don't want to ruin it now. Take your time warming the material using the heat gun and pulling the material over the edges. We suggest gluing one edge at a time as shown.


Photo 60 — Photo 60 – Gluing diagram of gluing of the material around inside edges, black representing the outside vinyl or leather and green is the inside. Suggest pulling the material over the top edge and gluing the edge #1 first. If you try to glue all the edges at once, the material when coming in contact with the glue on surface #2 may prevent the material from getting tucked into the corner. This is where those plastic tools in Photo 47 will be most beneficial. After the outside material is glued for the inside corner, continue to glue on edge #3. Edge #4 the inside covering is shown as a reference.

Photo 60 — Photo 60 – Gluing diagram of gluing of the material around inside edges, black representing the outside vinyl or leather and green is the inside. Suggest pulling the material over the top edge and gluing the edge #1 first. If you try to glue all the edges at once, the material when coming in contact with the glue on surface #2 may prevent the material from getting tucked into the corner. This is where those plastic tools in Photo 47 will be most beneficial. After you have a crisp inside corner, apply glue to surface #2. Once the material is firmly in place then continue on to edge #3. Edge #4 the inside covering is shown as a reference.


Photo 61 — View of the inside of the front panel. The excess material on the second lip was intentional knowing it will be covered.

Photo 61 — View of the inside of the front panel. The excess material on the second lip was intentional knowing it will be covered.


Photo 62 — A whole thin panel covered on mostly on the exposed side is inserted into the opening. It can be held in place with a few daps of silicone adhesive (in the event it has to come out, it will come loose easily versus fully glued in place. The back side doesn't have to be covered in full, just enough to pull the material over the edges. Use of miter corners will ensure a nice crisp edge when placed into the opening. It is details like this that will make you project trunk take on a nice professional appearance.

Photo 62 — We finish off the inside of the front panel with a thin panel covered on the exposed side. It can be held in place with a few daps of silicone adhesive so that it can be easily removed if necessary. The back side doesn't have to be covered in full, just enough to pull the material over the edges. Use of miter corners will ensure a nice crisp edge when placed into the opening. It is details like this that will make you project trunk take on a nice professional appearance.


Photo 63 — The inside of the trunk is now covered with material. Just as was done with the outer covering material, size and cut carefully. Since the inside material is so thin, suggest doing over lapping seams in the inside corners. That way no wood will show through. If your covering has a pattern ensure the pattern lines up correctly.

Photo 63 — Next we turn to the inside of the trunk. Just as was done with the outer covering material, size and cut carefully. Since the inside material is so thin, suggest doing overlapping seams in the inside corners. That way no wood will show through. These seams will be visible to be sure to get a good, straight cut. If your covering has a pattern be sure the pattern aligns correctly where the seams overlap.