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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 3 - Page 3

Photo 52 — A thin vinyl sheet is used to make up spacers to minimize the hasp from cutting into the material as the threaded rivets are tightened. Discretion should be used if one or more shim spacers will be required for your project.

Photo 52 — To prevent the hasp from cutting through the cover material, we created a thin vinyl "gasket" to separate the hasp from the cover.


Photo 53 — Similar to the hasp hardware, the alignment pin may need shims under it. Here two shims were needed. As a practical matter, if you can't find black vinyl sheet, you can always use a Sharpee brand marker to color the shim so it's not noticeable when the lid is lifted.

Photo 53 — Similar to the hasp hardware, the alignment pin may need shims under it. Here two shims were needed. As a practical matter, if you can't find black vinyl sheet, you can always use a Sharpee brand marker to color the edge of the shim so it's not noticeable.


Photo 54 — Front view of the alignment hardware on the front panel. The mating dowel end would be on the front of the lid. This was fastened using round head threaded rivets. Truss head versions would not sit into the depression well, but the round head fits nicely.

Photo 54 — Front view of the alignment hardware on the front panel. The mating dowel end would be on the front of the lid. This was fastened using round head threaded rivets. Truss head versions would not sit into the depression well, but the round head fits nicely.


Photo 55 — Necessity is the mother of invention. A design flaw noted during this project was the ability to easily lift the lid. Rather than add a separate piece of hardware, the locking hasps were modified. Here some brass flat stock was formed into a 'finger' hook, sanded, and plated before attaching to the lid with small wood screws. The upper hasp piece was notched to accept the hook.

Photo 55 — Necessity is the mother of invention. A design flaw noted during this project was the ability to easily lift the lid. Rather than add a separate piece of hardware, the locking hasps were modified. Here some brass flat stock was formed into a "finger" hook, sanded, and plated before attaching to the lid with small wood screws. The upper hasp piece was notched to accept the hook.


Photo 56 — The main body of the trunk project is fitted with one piece of material, starting from the rear, wrapping around one side, along the front and down the other side to the rear. There is only a small piece along the front that needs this, but it avoids a seam that would have to be covered.

Photo 56 — The main body of the trunk is fitted with one piece of material, starting from the rear, wrapping around one side, along the front and down the other side to the rear. There is only a small piece along the front that needs this, but it avoids a seam that would have to be covered.


Photo 57 — The main body of the trunk has been covered from a single piece. Starting at the front, it is glued and smoothed out, and then each side one at a time. This is a time where assistance would be helpful pulling the material around the sides and ending at the back.

Photo 57 — The main body of the trunk has been covered from a single piece. Starting at the front, it is glued and smoothed out, and then each side is glued, one at a time. This job requires more than two hands, so you will need an assistant to help pull the material around the sides and ending at the back.