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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 3 - Page 2

Photo 45 — Here the lid is sized with the cover material and cut to size for the sides and upper and lower edges. While the template you made can be used as a guide, suggest leaving extra material to be cut as you go. The template was employed as a learning guide, not as an absolute transfer for the final material.

Photo 45 — Here the lid is sized with the cover material and cut to size for the sides and upper and lower edges. While the template you made can be used as a guide, suggest leaving extra material to be cut as you go. Of course it is better to have too much than to have too little. The template was employed primnarily as a learning guide, not as an absolute pattern for the final material.


Photo 46 — The material is marked with a straight edge and cut to the corner.

Photo 46 — The material is marked with a straight edge and cut to the corner.


Photo 47 — These plastic pry bars are great tools to form the material into inside corners. A popsicle stick could be used as an alternative. A depression (line) formed with these tools makes a straighter line when cut.

Photo 47 — These plastic pry bars are great tools to form the material into inside corners. A popsicle stick could be used as an alternative. These tools can leave a sharp depression line in the material which makes it easier to make a straight cut.


Photo 48 — Covering your project should be done in logical steps. Here the front panel was covered on the outside, but stopped short to fasten hardware. Here the back side of the top locking hasps and alignment pin can be accessed to tighten the threaded rivets. Afterwards the material can be glued to conceal the holes.

Photo 48 — Covering your project should be done in logical steps. The front panel was covered on the outside, but stopped short to allow you to fasten the hardware. Here the back side of the top locking hasps and alignment pin can be accessed to tighten the threaded rivets. Afterwards the material can be glued in place, concealing the holes.


Photo 49 — Partial view of the polished stainless steel piano hinge fastened using truss head threaded rivets. The truss head is almost identical to the lead coated steel original nail used on piano hinges.

Photo 49 — Partial view of the polished stainless steel piano hinge fastened using truss head threaded rivets. The truss head is almost identical to the lead coated steel original nail used on our reference trunk's piano hinges.


Photo 50 — Locating holes for the threaded inserts is as simple as using a narrow center punch or other thin pointed

Photo 50 — Locating holes for the threaded inserts is as simple as using a narrow center punch or other thin pointed "awl" type tool. Once a hole is located, it can be widened from the front.


Photo 51 — The threaded inserts revealed, another problem is clearly shown, the thin edge of a hasp and other hardware will cut into the material. This could be a problem over time.

Photo 51 — The threaded inserts revealed, another problem is clearly shown, the thin edge of a hasp and other hardware could cut into the material. This could be a problem over time.