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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 2 - Page 4

Apply your fastening hardware using the threaded rivet method for all locations. Hasp bases should be located first. Suggest adding scrap pieces of the covering to simulate the gaps (Photos 31) and carefully measure and mark the other hardware (i.e. hook end of the hasp, Photo 32). Continue with placing hardware as described in Photos 33 through 36 with special care when drilling for the piano hinge. The preferred method is to use a brad point drill bit the size of the hole to mark for the center of each hole followed by drilling a slightly smaller hole dictated by the size of the threaded insert. In this case, 6-32 was the threaded rivet size and a #6 brass threaded insert was used. Microfasteners Drill Chart:

Microfasteners Drill Chart:

Brass Insert Drill Size
4-4011/64"
6-3211/64"
8-3213/64"
10-3215/64"
1/4-205/16"

Take note when screwing in the brass inserts that the cut side goes in first. Some have been tempted to use the cut side for a regular flat blade screw driver which is wrong. The cut side actually cuts threads into the wood and helps secure it when backing the mandrel out. Hint: when applying the inserts using the drill-driver and a mandrel to the desired depth, quickly reverse the driver and the threaded insert will usually stay in place. On occasion, a threaded insert may get jammed on the mandrel's shoulder and when this happens, the insert may twist out. Gently reapply into the hole and if necessary apply a few drops of Kwik Poly into the hole to secure it into the wood. Don't apply too much that would get onto the machine threads. The concept of using threaded rivets and inserts may sound like a big chore, but the finished results are outstanding. These are the "details" everyone talks about on first-class restorations and the results are superior to using screws or nails. Isn't it worth spending an extra 2-3 hours to make a long-lasting accessory trunk that will stand up to the test of time?

Photo 31 — To facilitate good fit for the locking hasps and of the alignment hardware (middle), several pieces of the covering material are taped to the lid and front panel. They provide the necessary spacing for fitting the hardware which must be done now to properly locate the threaded inserts.

Photo 31 — To facilitate good fit for the locking hasps and of the alignment hardware (middle), several pieces of the covering material are taped to the lid and front panel and wrapped over the mating surfaces so that you can account for the thickness of the material when locating the hardware. They provide the necessary spacing for fitting the hardware which must be done now to properly locate the threaded inserts.


Photo 32 — Locating hardware is critical to a good final trunk project. Hasps such as this must pull the panels together. Too loose and the hasp can fly open and too tight the hasp can break or apply too much pressure on the covering material. Here the base of the hasp is attached first and the hook side is temporarily held with tape while the panels are checked for fit. A good sharp pencil clearly marks the location for the holes.

Photo 32 — Locating hardware is critical to a good final trunk project. Hasps such as this must pull the panels together. Too loose and the hasp can fly open and too tight the hasp can break or apply too much pressure on the covering material. Here the base of the hasp is attached first and the hook side is temporarily held with tape while the panels are checked for fit. A good sharp pencil clearly marks the location for the holes.


Photo 33 — The piano hinge is predrilled with the desired spacing for the threaded rivets. The piano hinge on the front panel is temporarily held in with machine screws at the ends.

Photo 33 — The piano hinge is predrilled with the desired spacing for the threaded rivets. The piano hinge on the front panel is temporarily held in with machine screws at the ends.


Photo 34 — A brad point drill is used to locate the center for each brass threaded insert. Once the centers for all 36 holes have been located, use the brad point drill of appropriate size to fully drill the holes.

Photo 34 — A brad point drill is used to locate the center for each brass threaded insert. Once the centers for all 36 holes have been located, use the brad point drill of appropriate size to fully drill the holes.


Photo 35 — Countersunk holes are filled in with Kwik Poly. The Kwik Poly mix used Durham's wood putty as a filling agent which does not shrink and sands easily.

Photo 35 — Countersunk holes are filled in with Kwik Poly. The Kwik Poly mix used Durham's wood putty as a filling agent which does not shrink and sands easily.


Photo 36 — A special mandrel connected to a drill driver is used to quickly insert the brass threaded inserts. Note the use of a mark on the mandrel to establish the set depth and note the cut end of the insert goes in first (to cut the wood threads. The cut end is not for a regular blade screwdriver.

Photo 36 — A special mandrel connected to a drill driver is used to quickly insert the brass threaded inserts. Note the use of a mark on the mandrel to establish the set depth and note the cut end of the insert goes in first (to cut the wood threads. The cut end is not for a regular blade screwdriver.


Photo 37 — Overall view of the box so far. Note the hinge holes in the rear wood strip and ¼ X 2 inch hard wood strips have been glued in place on the top and front edges (the edges where the front panel and lid will mate to the base).

Photo 37 — Overall view of the box so far. Note the hinge holes in the rear wood strip and 1/4 X 2 inch hard wood strips have been glued in place on the top and front edges (the edges where the front panel and lid will mate to the base).


Photo 38 — Rear view of the project trunk with the lid resting in place. All 36 holes have been drilled and now ready for the threaded inserts.

Photo 38 — Rear view of our project trunk with the lid resting in place. All 36 holes have been drilled and now ready for the threaded inserts.


Photo 39 — Side view of the project trunk. Threaded inserts have been installed in the middle area for the side handle loops and the front edge for the hasp base. Now that the trunk is built, this is a good time to apply a sanding sealer.

Photo 39 — Side view of our trunk shows threaded inserts have been installed in the middle area for the side handle loops and the front edge for the hasp base. Now that the trunk is built, this is a good time to apply a sanding sealer.


In Part 3 we'll wrap up our Trunk Project with guidelines on covering the trunk.