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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 2 - Page 3

Photo 27 — Long bar clamps are used during construction to firmly hold the side pieces together while they are screwed and the glue dries.

Photo 27 — Long bar clamps are used during construction to firmly hold the side pieces while they are screwed together and the glue dries.


Photo 28 — Flat head screws are used in addition to the glue. Note they are located where there is not a biscuit. Biscuit joints are marked in pencil.

Photo 28 — Flat head screws are used in addition to the glue. Note they are located where there is not a biscuit. The X marks the position of the biscuit joints.


Now that the trunk is partially built, this is a good time to finalize how you will fasten your trunk to the rack. This project strategically placed four Tee style blind nuts into the base (Photos 29 & 30). Later two metal bars will secure the trunk into these blind nuts. In this case the side dimensions were not that important, but the front to rear placement was critical as to not interfere with the existing rack. One goal in our trunk project was to not drill any holes in the original rack, and use extra metal hardware to sandwich the trunk to the rack (Photo 68). Each trunk project is different and your situation may require that you choose a fastening method that best suits your rack for both strength and esthetics.

Photo 29 — The design of this project trunk has it fastened to the rack from underneath. Here four blind nuts are inserted into the 3/4 inch base.

Photo 29 — The design of this project trunk has it fastened to the rack from underneath. Here four blind nuts are inserted into the 3/4 inch base.


Photo 30 — Close up view of the blind nut in Photo 29.  Many styles of blind hardware are available. This one has a lip and countersunk into the base. It was planned to be covered later by a thin precovered wood layer, so filling it in was not necessary although using proper length bolts was critical.

Photo 30 — Close up view of the blind nut in Photo 29. Many styles of blind hardware are available. This one has a lip and countersunk into the base. It was planned to be covered later by a thin precovered wood layer, so filling it in was not necessary but you need to use proper length bolts so that they do not protrude and interfer with the installation of interior panel.


One technique to fasten all hinges and functioning hasp and alignment hardware to your trunk is to use threaded rivets. For more information see How to Use Threaded Rivets. This involves setting a threaded brass insert (available from the local hobby shop or Microfasteners) into the wood for each threaded rivet. This provides the most invisible means versus using nuts on the inside. While this may seem rather tedious and it did involve setting more than sixty inserts for this Lincoln trunk, the use of a drill-driver and a threaded mandrel (shown in the reference article) made the job much easier than it sounds. Inserts can be applied at about one per minute with a little experience. The results of using threaded rivets are far more durable than simple nails. Carefully select the head styles for your project when ordering from either Tioga Stainless, Totally Stainless or Restoration Supply. The piano hinges look better with 6-32 truss head rivets while round head version are more appealing to hasp and other hardware. Simple machine screws can be used for fitting purposes until you're ready to install the threaded rivets. Regular domed head nails from Frank Chervan can be used for simpler decorative hardware if you choose.