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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

HOW-TO

Classic Car Accessory Trunks: Designing and Fabricating your Own Trunk - Part 1 - Page 3

Photo 9 — This is a trunk photographed on a model L Lincoln, likely manufactured by Taylor. Even though it has damage on the corner, it provides a wealth of information. It uses brackets on the side and rear where metal rods could be passed through them to fasten the trunk to the rack. Two other details are the piano hinge was painted and the button snap hardware on the side and rear where a full size cover may have been used sometime in the trunk's life and may not be original.

Photo 9 — This is a trunk photographed on a model L Lincoln, likely manufactured by Taylor. Even though it has damage on the corner, it provides a wealth of information. It uses brackets on the side and rear where metal rods could be passed through them to fasten the trunk to the rack. Two other details are the piano hinge was painted and the button snap hardware on the side and rear where a full size cover may have been used sometime in the trunk's life and may not be original.


Photo 10 — This trunk uses two leather straps to secure it to the rack which can be annoying if you plan to regularly open and close the trunk.

Photo 10 — This trunk uses two leather straps to secure it to the rack which can be annoying if you plan to regularly open and close the trunk.


Photo 11 — Side view of the trunk in Photo 10. Note the generous use of decorative nails holding the leather corner protective strip.

Photo 11 — Side view of the trunk in Photo 10 shows the generous use of decorative nails holding the leather corner protective strip.


Photo 12 — The shape of this trunk makes it almost certain it was manufactured by Beals & Selkirk. They were known for the recessed area on the side. This design has the entire lid as a clam shell (good for preventing water intrusion) and used custom latches and alignment pin hardware. This trunk likely is secured to the rack from underneath.

Photo 12 — The shape of this trunk makes it almost certain it was manufactured by Beals & Selkirk. They were known for the recessed area on the side. This design has the entire lid as a clam shell (good for preventing water intrusion) and used custom latches and alignment pin hardware. This trunk likely is secured to the rack from underneath.


Photo 13 — High end classics such as this Stutz used a custom trunk to fit into the body opening. It features separate compartments for the suitcase, nicely aligned metal strips on the body and lid, and covered in material that matches the convertible top.

Photo 13 — High end classics such as this Stutz used a custom trunk to fit into the body opening. It features separate compartments for suitcases, nicely aligned metal strips on the body and lid, and it was covered in material that matches the convertible top.


Photo 14 — This is another example of a custom trunk, this time on a REO. It fits snuggly into the body's opening and even has custom curved angle between the trunk and body. This REO model also has a separate folding rack to add on another trunk is so desired.

Photo 14 — This is another example of a custom trunk, this time on a REO. It fits snuggly into the body's opening and even has custom curved angle between the trunk and body. This REO model also has a separate folding rack to add on another trunk is so desired.


Photo 15 — This trunk was photographed at a show. It appears to be either refurbished or newly fabricated. Some of the positive details is the use of a small size chain to limit the front panel opening, upper lid profile that is angled down and to the front (good for drainage), and thin panels inside covered in cloth that complimented the car. Thin panels fully covered can hide other covering practices while still be pleasing and complimentary to the vehicle. This technique was used on this project trunk (Photo 62).

Photo 15 — This trunk was photographed at a show. It appears to be either refurbished or newly fabricated. Some of the positive details is the use of a small size chain to limit travel of the front panel opening, upper lid profile that is angled down and to the front (good for drainage), and thin panels inside covered in cloth that complimented the car. Thin panels applied over the inside walls of the trunk can hide the not-so-pretty elements required in the covering process. This leaves the trunk pleasing and complimentary to the vehicle and is technique we used on the project trunk described in this article.


Photo 16 — Close up view of the lid opening hardware from Photo 16. It is a good use of hardware that is currently available, to limit the lid from opening too far and is nicely installed, though the use of Phillips head screws would not be period correct. Some hardware include locking methods to hold the lid at a given height.

Photo 16 — Close up view of the lid opening hardware used in the trunk in Photo 15. It is a good use of hardware that is currently available, to limit the lid from opening too far and is nicely installed. However, the use of Phillips head screws would not be period correct. Some hardware of this type may include a method for holding the lid open at a given height.


Photo 17 — An unusual detail about this trunk are the large metal corners on the lid. Corners like this offer protection, a degree of elegance, can hide seams when covered with a material such as thin leather or fabric. These corners would be a real challenge to duplicate.

Photo 17 — An unusual detail about this trunk are the large metal corners on the lid. Corners like this offer protection, a degree of elegance, and can hide seams when covered with a material such as thin leather or fabric. These corners would be a real challenge to duplicate.


Photo 18 — This original 'boxy' looking trunk is on a model Lincoln and is the basis for the design used in this article. The significant design aspects are the depth (19-1/2 inches), width (34 inches), and height (21 inches) all derived from the photo using the rack's dimensions and the height was extrapolated using the other dimensions and relationship to the body's molding. The depth is unique to Lincoln which adds to the challenge of ever finding one at a flea market that fits properly and why a new fabrication was warranted. Note the little flip-up lid detail on top and where the piano hinge is located for the front panel to fold down over the rack. While the flip-up lid feature is original, the size doesn't offer much and the location of the hinge on top likely would present water problems.

Photo 18 — This original "boxy" looking trunk is on a Lincoln and is the basis for the design used in this article. The significant design aspects are the depth (19-1/2 inches), width (34 inches), and height (21 inches). We derived those dimensions from the photo using the rack's dimensions and the height was extrapolated using the other dimensions and relationship to the body's molding. The depth is unique to Lincoln which adds to the challenge of finding one at a flea market that fits properly. This is why a new fabrication was warranted. While the top flip-up lid feature is original, it doesn't offer much in terms of function and is susceptible to leaking, so we decided to eliminate it from our design.


In our Part 2 we will be looking at the construction process. Stay tuned!