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Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car
Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

Second Chance Garage

For the Classic Car Restoration Enthusiast

Second Chance Garage

FEATURE ARTICLES

Dodge truck Cartridge Lube Sock Filter

By John Gunnell

"Cartridge Lube Sock Filter" is not exactly a household term — even in the homes of vintage vehicle restorers. However, you might be familiar with this type of canister style oil filter if you own a 1946-1960 Dodge truck, a Clark forklift, a Flxible bus or a machine or truck with a Hercules, Hyster or IH engine.

These vehicles represent the principle applications for the Wix 51011 or NAPA 1011 oil filters. Since we were working on a 1953 Dodge B4 pickup that had been in dry storage for around 40 years, it seemed like a good idea to change the oil filter before attempting an initial start up of the engine.

The original oil filter canister was still mounted on the driver's side of the six-cylinder Dodge flathead engine, just above the starter motor. It was hanging in a bracket attached to the block. There was even a handle of sorts on top of the removable lid. Turning the handle counter-clockwise releases the lid so it can be removed, along with a gasket, to take out the oil filter element inside.

The oil filter canister is clamped to the engine block above the starter motor and below the horn. The T-handle on top clamps the lid and gasket down. We could see the word

The oil filter canister is clamped to the engine block above the starter motor and below the horn. The T-handle on top clamps the lid and gasket down. We could see the word "Deluxe" through the rust. (John Gunnell photo)


"One ugly sock" is about the only way to describe the dirty black filter that was stuffed into the canister on this '53 Dodge. The once-white, sock-like material was covered with grease and soaked in oil that was four decades old. As you can imagine, it was not a pretty sight. It looked like a rotted beehive with pockmarks on the top along with a wire bale to lift it out of the canister. It also looked a little shorter than a new No. 1011 NAPA filter. Was there a problem?

With the lid removed, you can see the holes that make pockmarks on the top of the sock type filters. An old filter is still in this canister and the rubber gasket or seal is still on the rim of the canister. You can see the opening on top of this style of filter and the wire-type lifting bale. (Todd Wilson photo)

With the lid removed, you can see the holes that make pockmarks on the top of the sock type filters. An old filter is still in this canister and the rubber gasket or seal is still on the rim of the canister. You can see the opening on top of this style of filter and the wire-type lifting bale. (Todd Wilson photo)


The sock type oil filters have an opening through their centers that fits over the oil delivery tube in the center of the canister. Different type os filters have different styles of openings. (Todd Wilson photo)

The sock type oil filters have an opening through their centers that fits over the oil delivery tube in the center of the canister. Different type of filters have different styles of openings. (Todd Wilson photo)


The filter canister was also a bit rusty looking, but we could see the word "Deluxe" showing through the coat of surface rust. By using some WD-40 and a rag, we were able to get rid of more and more rust and see even more of the writing on the canister. It read, "MOPAR OIL DELUXE FILTER JC Series. Deluxe Products Corp., La Porte, Ind." The number 1265706 could be read near the end that faced the truck's firewall. On the front end was the Patent No. 2168124.

The greasy and oily old filter was placed on the ground near the removed lid and the remnants of the old gasket. Everything was pretty cruddy and the sock-like material was totally impregnated with olg oil. (John Gunnell photo).

The greasy and oily old filter was placed on the ground near the removed lid and the remnants of the old gasket. Everything was pretty cruddy and the sock-like material was totally impregnated with old oil. (John Gunnell photo).




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